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Archive for September, 2007

Cleaning House

I think I have a problem.

See, whenever I step foot in a grocery store or a gourmet food shop, I cannot leave without buying some obscure ingredient that I think I may need for a recipe I saw once…somewhere.

And now all of the sweetened chestnut purees, semolina flours, dried figs and sliced, blanched and/or shelled nuts are taking over my kitchen. It’s getting ugly, folks.

So this weekend, I decided it was time to find that recipe I saw once…somewhere…and get on with it.

A jar of sweetened chestnut puree had been hibernating in my cupboard for a long time. Let’s put it this way: a friend has conceived and given birth since I bought this thing. I have also moved apartments. Like I said, long time.

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I leafed through my bloated cookbook collection and finally found the recipe I must have had in mind when I decided this was an item I could not live without: a sweet chestnut torte from Alice Medrich’s “Chocolate and the Art of Low-Fat Desserts.” She says it’s for anyone who, like her, loves chestnut puree and relishes the idea of eating it straight from the jar with a spoon. Now, I’m not one to pooh-pooh eating out of the jar (oh, my poor little peanut butter jar, how I have wronged thee…), but I’ve never plowed into a jar of sweetened chestnut puree with wild abandon. In fact, I don’t think I’ve ever tried sweetened chestnut puree – which is probably why I bought the jar in the first place.

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The chestnut “cream” I bought is simple: just chestnuts, sugar, pectin and vanilla, all blended together into a slightly gummy cream with flecks of chestnut throughout. Chestnuts have a mellow, mild flavor and are less oily and more starchy than traditional nuts. (In fact, during the Middle Ages, communities in southern Europe who didn’t have easy access to wheat flour used chestnuts as their primary source of carbohydrates. Who knew?)

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Alice combines this mellow, sweet cream with brandy, eggs yolks, flour and a little more vanilla, folds in sweetened egg whites and bakes this soufflé-like torte until it’s puffed and golden. When you take the torte out of the oven, it will look big and puffy, and you will be excited. And then fear will enter your heart as you watch it sink…sink…sink. But then, you will remember a fallen soufflé cake you made once and how wonderful that was, and all will be well.

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The final torte is light, moist and delicious. The chestnut flavor is subtle – you almost can’t place it, but then…there it is, mellow, sweet and delicious.The next jar I buy (and there will be a next) just might fall victim to my wily spoon – and I’d be surprised if it lasts a month in my pantry.

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Day Late, Dollar Short?

I know.  I’m really bringing up the rear with this whole food blog thing.

For two years, I have been lurking in the food blogosphere, checking my favorite sites almost daily, thinking, “I should do this.  I should start my own blog.”  But for one reason or another, I didn’t.

And then, to be honest, I think I got intimidated.  The food blogosphere exploded, filled with so many talented writers, photographers and cooks.  How could my blog have relevance in such a crowded field?  Wouldn’t my voice just get lost in the din?

But I’ve realized that everyone has something to contribute to this virtual foodie community, and it’s a community I want – and deep down feel like I need – to be a part of.

So here I am: behind the curve, but ready to get down to business.  Time to get cooking, writing and, of course, eating!  After all, “The proof of the pudding….”  😉

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